Loading Search Bar...
READY IN
20 mins
Nigiri-zushi Recipe

Nigiri-zushi

Rating 4-0 out of 5 - Most cooks definitely will make this recipe again
An Ideal Recipe for Slimmers
Graham

Recipe by  

Nigiri-zushi consists of a small portion of Sushi Rice that is shaped in the hands. A thin piece of fish like tuna or shrimp is draped over the top and, sometimes, a thin strip of nori seaweed is used to bind the fish to the rice and add colour and flavour.

      Preparation Time: 20 Minutes


Ingredients for Nigiri-zushi

If you are not familiar with any ingredients, please check our International Cooking Terms page.
US Imperial Measurements  UK Imperial Measurements  Metric Measurements

Currently displaying quantities in US Imperial Measurements
to serve 4:
4 cups
cold Japanese Sushi Rice
6 oz
tuna
6 oz
halibut
6 oz
red snapper
6 oz
mackerel
8
prawns
 
pickled ginger
2 teaspoons
wasabi paste
 
dark soy sauce

 

How to Cook Nigiri-zushi

  1. The basis is the same for all nigri. You form the rice into a slightly rounded shape and join a thin slice of raw fish or a cooked prawn (split down the middle) to it. The diagrams below should help..
    1Step 1
    1. Moisten your hands with 'Te-zu'
    2. Take about one ounce (25 g) of Sushi Rice in your right hand and make an egg-shaped rice ball in your palm.
    3. Pick up a piece of sliced fish with thumb and index finger of your other hand.
    Te-zu (hand-vinegar) is prepared by diluting rice vinegar with water by about 1:3.

    Preferably the temperatures of Sushi Rice (Shari) and your hands should be the same. Shari tends to stick to cold hands.
    2Step 2
    1. Holding the shaped Sushi Rice, scoop up a tiny amount of wasabi with the right index finger.
    2. Rest the fish between the second and third joints of your left hand fingers.
    3Step 3
    1. Smear the wasabi on the centre of the fish.
    No need to spread the Wasabi, otherwise it can prevent good cohesion between the fish and the rice.
    4Step 4
    1. Place the rice onto the fish.
    2. Gently press the centre of the rice with the thumb to introduce some air into the rice.
    'Airing' the rice is the most important part of making good nigiri-zushi.
    5Step 5
    1. Hold and close the nigiri by the four fingers of your left hand and press with two fingers of your right hand.
    2. Push down the end of the nigiri with the left thumb at the same time.
    Do not press too hard - just enough for the fish to adhere to the rice.
    6Step 6
    1. Turn your right hand round to show your palm.
    7Step 7
    1. Transfer the sushi (nigiri) from your left palm over to your right.
    8Step 8
    1. By turning each hand again in reverse, return the nigiri to left palm. Now it has been rotated horizontally by 180°.
    2. Again press and push as in step 5
    The other end is now made firm by the thumb.
    9Step 9
    1. By rolling the nigiri (either with a help of your right index finger, or simply rolling it in your palm) turn it so it has the fish side up.
    10Step 10
    1. Again press and push the same way as before.
    Do not press too much. The critical point is that the outside of the nigiri is firm enough but inside is still loose.
    11Step 11
    1. Pick up the nigiri and rotate horizontally by 180°.
    2. Again press and push in the same way.
    3. Repeat this once or twice more.
    12Step 12
    1. Make any final adjustments on both sides, if necessary, then press one last time.
    Nigiri of 'Funazoko' (ship-bottom) shape is now complete.
  2. The more Nigiri-zushi you make, the more expert you will become at shaping them. Carefully arrange them on a plate (or plates), along with a few slices of pickled ginger. In a small dipping bowl, pour a little soy sauce - about ½" (1cm) depth - and serve next to each plate.


Graham GRAHAM'S HOT TIP:
Be sure to slice the fish very thin. If it's too thick, it won't take the shape of the rice.
 
Print Kitchen-Friendly View

Reviews of Nigiri-zushi

Rating 4 out of 5 - Many cooks will make this recipe again May 14 2014
I always wondered how they made these! I'd tried often enough with no real chance of success but when I saw the illustrations here I thought I'd give it a go. I discovered that the REAL secret is not to take short cuts!! (My bad!). I tried using ordinary rice instead of making the proper sushi rice. As soon as i used sushi rice, these worked really well. I've got to perfect them yet, but practise will make perfect (and everybody is happy eating the results of my trials!)
(1 review)
 

Your Rating

Click to rate this recipe 'Hate It'Click to rate this recipe 'Didn't Like It'Click to rate this recipe 'Not Bad'Click to rate this recipe 'Liked It'Click to rate this recipe 'Loved It'
(click a star to select)

Your Review
(Max. 1000 characters) ....  characters left.


 Reviewer Logout
QUICK RATING
Please help us to provide the recipes you want by rating this recipe for content, clarity, originality or any other criteria that matter to you. Just select the relevant icon and then click...


Divine

Lovely

S'okay!

Hmmm!

C'mon!

Yaach!

Thank You... your feedback is important to us.
 
 

What To Eat Tonight

77 Romantic Dinners
77 Romantic Dinners

Dim the room, light the candles and prepare for something very special and perfect for a romantic evening. Guaranteed to light your fires.

10 Brilliant Barbecue Recipes
10 Brilliant Barbecue Recipes

The smoke, the sizzle, the aroma, yeah - it's time for BBQ but don't buy scrappy steaks if you want to eat like a king.

150 Healthy Recipes
150 Healthy Recipes

Just because it's healthy doesn't mean it needs to be boring and tasteless! Take a look at out healthy recipes for some great ideas.

Other Fish & Seafood Recipes

Tuna-Stuffed Tomatoes
Tuna-Stuffed Tomatoes

Tomatoes are extremely versatile creatures. They can be eaten hot or cold, on their own or as an accompaniment to other dishes.

Left-over Mussels
Left-over Mussels

Well I know it sounds strange to leave mussels uneaten but sometimes there are a few too many even for Meester Graham! No problem...

Sashimi (Raw Seafood)
Sashimi (Raw Seafood)

Sashimi is often the first course in a formal Japanese meal, but it can also be the main course, presented with rice and miso soup in separate bowls.

 

 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED © 2024 NeedARecipe.com
By accessing this site, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. Please read them.
up